Posts belonging to Category UBER economy



Elon Musk mulls mining venture for Tesla

Objective: produce electric car batteries

Tesla could go into the mining business in order to produce its batteries more quickly, Elon Musk has claimed.

The company is working on improving its battery production and technology, the chief executive said at the company’s annual shareholder meeting.

“We might get into the mining business, I don’t know. We’ll do whatever we can to make sure we can scale as fast as possible,” he said.

The California-based electric car company will also make a car which can drive 400 miles between charges.

https://finance.yahoo.com

Uber and Lyft strikes

US drivers stop taking rides in protest over pay

Rideshare drivers are striking and protesting in major cities across the United States, with many participating in a 24-hour strike of the Uber and Lyft apps that began at midnight on 8 May.

Cities affected by the stoppage – which varies in length from two-hour strikes to day-long boycotts – include Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, San Diego, Philadelphia and others. Strikes are also expected overseas in Britain, Australia and elsewhere.

The protests come the day before Uber launches its shares in a public offering on the US stock exchange.

http://www.theguardian.com/

Amazon’s warehouse-worker tracking system can automatically fire people without a human supervisor’s involvement

Amazon has fired more than 300 workers, citing productivity, at a single facility in Baltimore in a single year 

Amazon’s demanding culture of worker productivity has been revealed in multiple investigations. But a new report indicates that the company doesn’t just track worker productivity at its warehouses — it also has a system that can automatically fire them.

Amazon has fired more than 300 workers, citing productivity, at a single facility in Baltimore in a single year (August 2017 through September 2018), The Verge’s Colin Lecher reported. The Verge cited a letter by an Amazon attorney as part of a case with the National Labor Relations Board.

An Amazon spokesperson confirmed to Business Insider, “Approximately 300 employees turned over in Baltimore related to productivity in this timeframe. In general, the number of employee terminations have decreased over the last two years at this facility as well as across North America.”

Amazon’s system tracks a metric called “time off task,” meaning how much time workers pause or take breaks, The Verge reported. It has been previously reported that some workers feel so pressured that they don’t take bathroom breaks.

http://www.businessinsider.com

Uber’s self-driving unit valued at $7.25 billion

Softbank, Toyota and Denso will invest $1 billion

Uber’s autonomous vehicle unit has raised $1 billion from a consortium of investors including SoftBank Group Corp, giving the company a much-needed funding boost for its pricey self-driving ambitions on the eve of its public stock offering.

Uber Technologies Inc said on Thursday that the investment values its Advanced Technologies Group, which works to develop autonomous driving technology, at $7.25 billion. SoftBank will invest $333 million from its $100 billion Vision Fund, while Toyota Motor Corp and automotive parts supplier Denso Corp will invest a combined $667 million.

Toyota will also contribute up to an additional $300 million over the next three years to help cover the costs of building commercial self-driving vehicles, Uber said.

http://www.reuters.com/

Uber warns it may never make a profit

IPO filing indicates how far Uber remains from turning a profit

Technologies Inc has 91 million users, but growth is slowing and it may never make a profit, the ride-hailing company said on Thursday in its IPO filing.The document gave the first comprehensive financial picture of the decade-old company which was started after its founders struggled to get a cab on a snowy night and has changed the way much of the world travels.TheUber S-1 filing underscores Uber’s rapid growth in the last three years but also how a string of public scandals and increased competition from rivals have weighed on its plans to attract and retain riders.

The disclosure also highlighted how far Uber remains from turning a profit, with the company cautioning it expects operating expenses to “increase significantly in the foreseeable future” and it “may not achieve profitability.”

https://www.reuters.com/

Uber plans to sell around $10 billion worth of stock in IPO

Uber is seeking a valuation of between $90 billion and $100 billion

Uber Technologies has decided it will seek to sell around $10 billion worth of stock in its initial public offering, and will make public the registration of the offering on Thursday, people familiar with the matter said on Tuesday.

An IPO of this size would make Uber one of the biggest technology IPOs of all time, and the largest since that of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding in 2014.

Uber is seeking a valuation of between $90 billion and $100 billion, influenced by the poor performance of smaller rival Lyft’s shares following its IPO late last month, the sources said. Investment bankers previously told Uber it could be worth as much as $120 billion.

https://www.cnbc.com/

Lyft raises IPO price target

Investors fret over missing out

Lyft Inc on Wednesday raised the price range for its initial public offering, as investors looked past the ride-hailing startup’s mounting losses to the company’s growing market share against larger rival Uber Technologies Inc.
Lyft raised its IPO price range to between $70 and $72 per share, meaning the ride-hailing company is now targeting a valuation of up to $24.3 billion. The increased range, from $62-$68 previously, is the result of investors worrying about missing out on the biggest U.S. IPO since Snap Inc in 2017.

https://www.reuters.com/

Uber buys rival Careem in $3.1 billion deal

Uber wants to dominate ride-hailing in Middle East

Uber said late on Monday night it would pay $1.4 billion in cash and $1.7 billion in convertible notes in a deal that gives it full ownership of Careem. The long-expected agreement ends more than nine months of start-and-stop negotiations between the two companies and hands Uber a much-needed victory after a series of overseas divestments.

The notes will be convertible into Uber shares at a price equal to $55 apiece, Uber said, marking a nearly 13 percent increase over Uber’s share price in its last financing round, led by SoftBank Group Corp more than a year ago.

https://www.reuters.com/

Uber IPO Could Be One of Five Biggest NYSE Listings in History

Uber chooses the New York Stock Exchange

Uber Technologies has selected the New York Stock Exchange for its imminent initial public offering, handing the trading floor what could be one of the five biggest listings of all time, according to a person familiar with the matter, who asked not to be identified as the details aren’t public.

The ride-hailing giant is expected to publicly file for its offering in April, kicking off a listing that could value the company at as much as $120 billion and is likely to be the biggest of the year, people familiar with the plans have said previously. At that valuation, Uber would only have to float about 16% of its shares to make the top five, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

https://www.fortune.com/

Facebook should be regulated like a cigarette company

The Social media needs to be regulated like every other industry

Election interference has opened the door for the government to clamp down on social media companies. But while executives from Facebook, Google and Twitter have made multiple trips to testify in front of Congress, there’s been no clear movement towards enforcement.

Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff offered up an analogy: Treat social media like a health issue, similar to tobacco and sugar.

“I think that you do it exactly the same way that you regulated the cigarette industry. Here’s a product: Cigarettes. They’re addictive, they’re not good for you,” Benioff told CNBC’s “Squawk Alley” on Tuesday. “I think that for sure, technology has addictive qualities that we have to address, and that product designers are working to make those products more addictive and we need to rein that back.” Benioff said that there’s confusion about whether social media use is bad for people and it’s the government’s job to step in and provide clarity for parents. There’s a smoking age for cigarettes and regulations around how they can be promoted, but no such rules exist for social media.

http://cnbc.com

Co-working is just getting started

Investors think highly of buildings that include 15%-30% co-working space

In just the last year, co-working spaces have tripled their share of Manhattan’s office-leasing activity to around 10%, according to real estate brokerage firm Avison Young. Across the country, the number of square feet they occupy has jumped nearly 400% over the last eight years. As the market for flexible and customized offices continues to boom, it’s not just startups and small businesses that stand to benefit. More and more, larger companies that don’t want to be locked into decades-long leases are considering the upsides of flexible spaces.

In August, WeWork launched HQ by WeWork to serve the needs of medium-sized businesses. And other giants (think: Amazon, Verizon, and more) have already begun turning to co-working spaces to house entire divisions of their companies. In 2017, IBM struck a deal with WeWork to occupy its 88 University Place building in Manhattan.
http://www.angel.co

Stiglitz: US has a major monopoly problem

Economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the few

The Nobel Prize winner argues that an economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the few. There is much to be concerned about in America today: a growing political and economic divide, slowing growth, decreasing life expectancy, an epidemic of diseases of despair. The unhappiness that is apparent has taken an ugly turn, with an increase in protectionism and nativism. Trump’s diagnosis, which blames outsiders, is wrong, as are the prescriptions that follow. But we have to ask: Is there an underlying problem that can and must be addressed?
There is a widespread sense of powerlessness, both in our economic and political life. We seem no longer to control our own destinies. If we don’t like our Internet company or our cable TV, we either have no place to turn, or the alternative is no better. Monopoly corporations are the primary reason that drug prices in the United States are higher than anywhere else in the world. Whether we like it or not, a company like Equifax can gather data about us, and then blithely take insufficient cybersecurity measures, exposing half the country to the risk of identity fraud, and then charge us for but a partial restoration of the security that we had before a major breach.

Stiglitz: US has a major monopoly problem

Economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the few.

The Nobel Prize winner argues that an economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the few. There is much to be concerned about in America today: a growing political and economic divide, slowing growth, decreasing life expectancy, an epidemic of diseases of despair. The unhappiness that is apparent has taken an ugly turn, with an increase in protectionism and nativism. Trump’s diagnosis, which blames outsiders, is wrong, as are the prescriptions that follow. But we have to ask: Is there an underlying problem that can and must be addressed?

There is a widespread sense of powerlessness, both in our economic and political life. We seem no longer to control our own destinies. If we don’t like our Internet company or our cable TV, we either have no place to turn, or the alternative is no better. Monopoly corporations are the primary reason that drug prices in the United States are higher than anywhere else in the world. Whether we like it or not, a company like Equifax can gather data about us, and then blithely take insufficient cybersecurity measures, exposing half the country to the risk of identity fraud, and then charge us for but a partial restoration of the security that we had before a major breach.

www.rooseveltinstitute.org

Bernie Sanders wants to slap a special tax on Amazon

“Wages are so low, employees forced to depend on food stamps”

Senator Bernie Sanders wants to slap a special tax on Amazon and other big companies that employ workers who collect food stamps and other public assistance. But Amazon disputes Sanders’ depiction, saying its pay and benefits are competitive with other retailers. The progressive icon from Vermont has been on the attack lately, posting a series of Facebook videos over the past week calling out Amazon (AMZN) and Walmart (WMT) for not paying a living wage, which he lists in some posts as $15 an hour. In one video, titled “Get Amazon Off of Corporate Welfare,” he highlighted that CEO Jeff Bezos is the world’s richest person and earns $260 million a day, while many of his workers are on food stamps.

“Mr. Bezos continues to pay many thousands of his Amazon employees wages that are so low that they are forced to depend on taxpayer-funded programs, such as food stamps, Medicaid and subsidized housing in order to survive,” Sanders said in the video, stressing that taxpayers foot the bill for these benefits. “Frankly, I don’t believe that ordinary Americans should be subsidizing the wealthiest people in the world because they pay their employees inadequate wages.”
http://www.cnn.com

62% of America’s Jobs Pay Less Than $20 Per Hour

US has 130 million jobs overall

Almost two-thirds of America’s jobs aren’t paying a cent more than $20 an hour, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). That means 62 percent of the nation’s jobs offer their employees less than $41,600 a year! The BLS report (h/t Horizon Credit Union) notes that the US has 130 million jobs overall.  Of those positions, 18 million pay less than $10 an hour and a startling 63 million pay between $10 and $20. Add it all up and you’ve got 81 million jobs (out of 130 million) paying their workers less than $20. This includes administrative assistants, personal care aides, and retail workers.

Employers that offer a more generous salary, more than $42,000 a year, make up about 38 percent of the nation’s jobs. According to CNN Money, 27 million jobs offer an hourly pay between $20 and $30. That includes plumbers, office supervisors, electricians, and insurance sales agents — all four positions have an hourly pay that hover around $24 an hour, an annual salary of about $50,000.
https://www.madamenoire.com/